Social Justice Programs

Social Justice Collective (SJC)

The BOSS Social Justice Collective (SJC) encourages greater participation in civic and political processes by people with criminal records. 

The SJC works through the following strategies: 

  • Advocacy/Organizing 
  • Community Education 
  • Coalition-Building 
  • Leadership Development

Partners include: ACLU Northern California, All of Us or None, Black Women Organized for Political Action, Californians for Safety and Justice, Community and Youth Outreach, Ella Baker Center for Human Rights, Impact Justice, League of Women Voters Oakland, Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, National Institute for Criminal Justice Reform, Root & Rebound

Current SJC Activities

#TimeDone

Advocating to remove 4,800 barriers that stand between returning citizens and successful reentry

Social Justice Collective Innovations Project 

Three cohorts of 10 returning citizens being trained on civic engagement 

Legislative Advocacy/Lobby Days

Advocating for public policies that better support those who impacted by inequity and injustice

Leadership Development

Educating participants on social justice issues —and how to share their stories to shape better policy

Voter Education and Registration

Educating and registering under-represented individuals to VOTE

Breaking Barriers

Policy summits bringing together justice system professionals with system-impacted individuals to support reform solutions 

501c4

Long-term goal: create a separate advocacy organization for lasting change

 

California Reentry Providers Association

(More information coming soon)

 

James Metters on the Life-Changing Impact of Prop 57

James R. Metters, Jr., who was sentenced to 35 years to life after receiving his “third strike” for unarmed robbery, was released on parole in January 2020 thanks to Prop 57 – the Public Safety and Rehabilitation Act passed by California voters in 2016. Listen to James as he reflects on how he has grown emotionally and academically during his 25 years of being incarcerated and how being released under Prop 57 has given him a “chance to live again — this time the right way.”